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Pride’s Prison

30 Jan

Pride’s Prison

This story is an absolutely wonderful sci-fi approach to understanding the life struggles of an awkward child.  the sci-fi element is not obtrusive.  It is only employed to make the story possible.  The story is more about self-improvement, forgiveness and understanding than scientific wonders of any kind.  I recommend you read this and allow it to inspire you to write a short story of your own.

It’s a 4 part story with links to the next part at the bottom of each page.

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4 Comments

Posted by on January 30, 2012 in Authors, Short Stories

 

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4 responses to “Pride’s Prison

  1. Donald Schneider

    January 31, 2012 at 1:23 pm

    Roger,

    Thank you for your reply, which is most appreciated. Per your request, here is the link to the DoC page that contains the photo of your family and you:

    http://www.fcmonongahela.com/MissionsMissionaries.dsp

    As noted within my story, mild cases of TS often go/went undiagnosed, the more so the further back in time one considers. TS and ADHD are often comorbid, and I personally consider TS to be nothing but a distinct variation of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder; tics instead of bizarre rituals to deflect one’s attention away from obsessive, usually painful thoughts, not unlike a karate master screaming while breaking a board with his or her bare hand. I hold a minority opinion in that respect.

    Although I would very much like to read your story and review it on my personal website, I would hate to have to buy a Kindle just to purchase one short story. I otherwise would have no interest. Therefore, I was wondering if you would consider emailing it to me, either as an MS.doc attachment or a PDF, or within the body of the email. I’m sure it is worth far more than the token you are asking for it, and I would be pleased to make a donation to the DoC in return if you would provide a mailing address to do so. My email address is: bob@formsandsuppliesdirect.com

    I’m glad that you overcame your childhood difficulties and unpleasantries. Most of all, I’m glad your wife and you found each other and you have been so richly rewarded in life with your wonderful children and other spiritual and material blessings.

    Regarding your son, well, since he is sixteen now we’ll just have to wait thirty years or so and he can play the older character!

    Thanks again and best wishes.

    Don Schneider

     
    • rogerdengle

      January 31, 2012 at 10:58 pm

      Don,
      I remember that picture! That was years ago, but I still look much the same. My wife looks younger now than she did then. (In case she ever reads this…) The taller son in the back is in the US Air Force now. The son in the middle is 14 now and the red-head in front of me is the sixteen-year-old. The little brown fellow is Selvin. We adopted him when he was only 6 but because he was so small and we had no factual information on him we thought he was 3. He’s 15 now. Victoria is ten now and thinks she’s thirty. The playground and building behind us was the beginnings of House of Hope, the ministry we helped to found here.
      I emailed you about the Kindle Cloud Reader and the issue of giving away the manuscript while it is offered on Amazon. (I’m looking into that, by the way.)
      Thanks for following up with the link.
      Roger

       
  2. rogerdengle

    January 31, 2012 at 12:42 pm

    Wow Don!
    Thank you for your warm comments. It always blesses me to know I can be a blessing to others. The picture you spoke of…could you be so kind as to copy/paste the link for it here? I have two boys that are 18 months apart. The other son is almost 20 now, but the two younger ones are 14 and 16 now. The sixteen-year-old has quite a talent for mimicking accents and voices. If he is the one you spoke of, and I think he may be, he would have been perfect for the role when he was younger.
    You asked if it was him I had in mind while reading the story. To be quite honest with you, it was me. Born in ’69 I was always quite awkward. I wasn’t ever diagnosed with Turrets or ADHD, but the symptoms were there, at least for the ADHD part. I made it through school, although most of my teachers hated me, and those that didn’t hate me usually pitied me. My classmates were very rough on me. It was a difficult time for me, but just like Bobby in your story, I was resilient. I managed to somehow convince the woman of my dreams to marry me after several years of pursuit and I’ve been happily and faithfully married ever since.
    It’s been a pleasure reading your story and your comments about my posting of it here. Keep visiting, if you will. I enjoyed having you here.
    Oh, one last thing? I don’t go by Rev. *smiles*

     
  3. Donald Schneider

    January 31, 2012 at 8:52 am

    Dear Rev. Engle:

    On behalf of Dr. Donald Webb, editor of *Bewildering Stories*—the online publication on which this story was published—and myself, thank you so very much for having extended what must be your most precious time in having read “Pride’s Prison” and most kindly publicly commenting upon it. I saw a photograph of your family and you in front of your mission in Honduras on a Disciples of Christ missionary website. Between your religious calling and what certainly appears to be a rich family life, I don’t know how you get the time to read and write as a leisure activity, but I’m grateful that you apparently do.

    By the way, looking at the photo of your family he who appears to be your middle son, the boy standing directly in front of you, would look to have been, from a strictly physical perspective, an ideal candidate to play my younger character at that age had the story been a movie. I wonder if you envisioned him while reading the story. Do you think he could do an East Coast accent, if youse knows what I mean?

    As a quid pro quo for your kindness, I shall presently investigate the possibility of purchasing your *The Lost Flip Flop…* and perhaps reviewing it on my website. I’m just a hobbyist but I write what I believe to be professional quality literary reviews.

    Thank you again, sir, for your kindness. Perhaps your stellar example shall inspire me to rekindle my faith à la my older character’s swan song reconversion.

    Very best regards,

    Don Schneider

     
 
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